Comparative bioinformatics analysis of prognostic and differentially expressed genes in non-muscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer

Bladder Cancer
30/08/2020

J Proteomics. 2020 Aug 26:103951. doi: 10.1016/j.jprot.2020.103951. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Bladder cancer (BC) is classified into non-muscle (NMIBC) and muscle invasive (MIBC) diseases. Several molecular alterations were previously associated with NMIBC and MIBC, but few studies have systematically compared the molecular differences between these subtypes. Here, we analyzed prognostic and differentially expressed genes in NMIBC and MIBC, using an integrative bioinformatics approach. These genes were used in functional enrichment and co-expression protein interaction (COPI) network


analyses to reveal common and exclusive biological functions involved in NMIBC and MIBC. In NMIBC, the enriched functions were related to oxidative stress response, cell cycle, glutathione metabolism, ubiquitination and protein translation. Conversely, enriched functions in MIBC were extracellular matrix organization, cell migration and actin cytoskeleton. Several genes in NMIBC did not overlap with those reported to MIBC, suggesting these subtypes may have distinct underlying mechanisms. Particularly, MIBC genes were enriched for functions involved in cell migration and invasion, which could help to molecularly differentiate NMIBC and MIBC. The analysis of COPI networks disclosed high centrality nodes that may be essential for NMIBC and MIBC. Further research will determine to which extent NMIBC and MIBC share common biological functions and identify potential candidates for the differential diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of NMIBC and MIBC. SIGNIFICANCE: This study has systematically compared prognostic and differentially expressed genes between non-muscle (NMIBC) and muscle invasive (MIBC) bladder cancer, using an integrative bioinformatics approach. Many genes and biological functions were exclusively associated with either NMIBC or MIBC, suggesting that these disease subtypes could be driven by distinct molecular mechanisms. Particularly, prognostic and differentially expressed genes in MIBC were involved in cell migration and invasion, which can help to molecularly differentiate the NMIBC and MIBC subtypes. Moreover, the analysis of co-expression protein interaction networks identified high centrality nodes that could be potential candidates for the prognosis and treatment of NMIBC and MIBC.