Evaluation of health care-associated infections following radical cystectomy

Bladder Cancer
20/09/2020

Actas Urol Esp. 2020 Sep 15:S0210-4806(20)30149-2. doi: 10.1016/j.acuro.2020.06.004. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: Radical cystectomy is a complex surgery with a high rate of complications including infections, which lead to increased morbidity and mortality, longer hospital stay and higher costs. The aim of this work is to evaluate health care-associated infections (HAIs) in these patients, as well as associated microorganisms, antibiotic resistance profiles and risk factors.


MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective study from 2012 to 2017. Epidemiologic variables, comorbidities and surgical variables are collected. The microorganisms involved and antibiotic susceptibility patterns are analyzed.

RESULTS: 122 patients. Mean age 67 (SD:18,42). Mean hospital stay 23.5 days (18.42). HAIs rate of 45%, with predominant urinary tract infections (43%) and surgical wound infections (31%). Positive cultures in 78.6% of cases. Increased isolation of Enterococcus (18%) and Escherichia coli (13%). Forty-three percent of microorganisms were resistant to amoxicillin/ampicillin, 23% to beta-lactamases and 36% to quinolones. Empirical treatment was adequate in 87.5%. Hospital stay is increased (17 days, p< 0.05) due to HAIs. Lower rate of infectious complications in the laparoscopic vs. open approach (p< 0.001) and in orthotopic vs. ileal conduit diversion (p = 0.04) CONCLUSIONS: We found a high rate of HAIs in our radical cystectomy series, with predominant urinary tract and surgical wound infections. E.coli and Enterococcus spp. are the most frequently isolated microorganisms, with high rates of resistance to some commonly used antibiotics.