Pre-diagnostic use of low-dose aspirin and risk of incident metastasis and all-cause mortality among patients with colorectal cancer

Colorectal Cancer
01/05/2020

Giorli G, et al. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2020.

ABSTRACT

AIM: Previous studies suggest that the use of low-dose aspirin before a colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis may be associated with a decreased risk of CRC progression. Data supporting this association, however, have been inconsistent. We evaluate whether the use of pre-diagnostic low-dose aspirin is associated with a lower risk of metastases and all-cause mortality in CRC patients.

METHODS: Using a large Italian population-based primary care database, we identified a cohort of 7478 patients newly diagnosed with non-metastatic CRC between 2000 and 2013. Use of pre-diagnostic low-dose aspirin was modelled as a time-varying variable and compared with no use of low-dose aspirin. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of incident metastasis and of all-cause mortality associated with pre-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use, both overall and by duration of use.

RESULTS: There were 314 incident metastatic events and 2189 deaths during a mean follow-up time of 4.4 and 4.7 years, respectively. Overall pre-diagnostic use of low-dose aspirin was not associated with a decreased risk of incident metastasis (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.63-1.22) or all-cause mortality (HR 1.09; 95% CI 0.96-1.22) in CRC patients. Cumulative duration of aspirin use was not associated with a decreased risk of incident metastasis (p-trend=0.22) or all-cause mortality (p-trend=0.38). These findings remained consistent in sensitivity analyses.

CONCLUSION: In this real-world, population-based study, the pre-diagnostic use of low-dose aspirin was not associated with a decreased risk of incident metastasis or all-cause mortality in CRC patients.