Three cases of non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia that developed after head and neck cancer therapy

Head and Neck Cancer
30/07/2020

Auris Nasus Larynx. 2020 Jul 25:S0385-8146(20)30160-7. doi: 10.1016/j.anl.2020.07.003. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) causes intestinal necrosis due to irreversible ischemia of the intestinal tract despite the absence of organic obstruction in the mesenteric blood vessels. The disease has extremely poor prognosis. We report three cases of NOMI hypothesized to have developed after head and neck cancer therapy; thus, we report these cases considering the available literature. Case 1: A 74-year-old man with T2N0M0 stage Ⅱ oropharyngeal carcinoma complained of abdominal pain


5 days after chemoradiotherapy. The patient was diagnosed with NOMI, and an emergency surgery was performed. Case 2: A 69-year-old man with T2N2bM0 stage IVA hypopharyngeal carcinoma complained of abdominal pain during TPF chemotherapy. The patient was diagnosed with NOMI, and he died on the same day. Case 3: A 82-year-old man with T2N2bM0 stage IVA hypopharyngeal carcinoma complained of abdominal pain with reduced level of consciousness, 5 days after total laryngopharyngectomy. The patient was diagnosed with NOMI, and an emergency surgery was performed on the same day. We therefore suggest that ENT physicians must be aware of NOMI as a complication that can develop after head and neck cancer therapy.