The Utility of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Examination Versus Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in the Detection of Second Primary Lesions in Korean Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

Head and Neck Cancer
05/08/2020

Ear Nose Throat J. 2020 Aug 4:145561320940089. doi: 10.1177/0145561320940089. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Head and neck cancer often accompany a synchronous secondary primary lesion in the digestive tract. The aim of this study was to compare detection rates between positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (G-fiber) or colonoscopy (C-fiber) in the initial staging and to analyze risk factors for premalignant, malignant, and total synchronous secondary primary lesions.

METHODS: A total of 739 patients with head and neck cancer who underwent PET-CT, G-fiber, or C-fiber were analyzed retrospectively.

RESULTS: Positron emission tomography-CT did not definitely detect any premalignant synchronous secondary primary lesions (0 [0%] of 739) but definitely detected 10 malignant synchronous secondary primary lesions (10 [1.35%] of 739). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy or C-fiber detected all 20 premalignant synchronous secondary primary lesions (20 [2.71%] of 739) and all 37 malignant synchronous secondary primary lesions (37 [5.00%] of 739). The patients with nasopharynx cancer tended to have premalignant synchronous secondary primary lesions (odds ratio [OR]: 3.793; 95% CI: 1.414-10.171; P = .008). Those with distant metastasis tended to have premalignant (OR: 4.743; 95% CI: 1.508-14.916; P = .009), malignant (OR: 3.803; 95% CI: 1.486-9.731; P = .005), and total synchronous secondary primary lesions (OR: 2.753; 95% CI: 1.159-6.538; P = .022).

CONCLUSIONS: Premalignant or malignant synchronous secondary primary lesions that were not definitely detected by PET-CT could be found in the endoscopic examination.