The Academic Facility Type is Associated with Improved Overall Survival for Early Stage Lung Cancer

Lung Cancer
03/07/2020

Merritt RE, et al. Ann Thorac Surg 2020.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early stage Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is potentially curable with surgical resection. The overall survival rate for early stage NSCLC may be determined by the healthcare facility type where patients receive their lung cancer treatment.

METHODS: A total of 103,748 cases with the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) clinical stage I and II NSCLC that were reported to the National Cancer Database at over 1,150 facilities were analyzed in this study. Healthcare facilities were dichotomized into the community and academic facility types. Marginal multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate differences in overall survival. Propensity score methodology with inverse probability of treatment weighting was used to adjust for facility volume and patient related baseline differences between facility types.

RESULTS: Patients with early stage NSCLC who were treated at academic facility types had a significantly better median overall survival (63.2 months) compared to patients who received care at community healthcare facilities (54.2 months) [HR= 0.86 (95% CI:0.82-0.91) (p<0.0001)]. The surgical quality outcomes for NSCLC surgery, including 30-day mortality, 90-day mortality, and the median number of lymph nodes removed were significantly better for patients treated at the academic facility types.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with early stage NSCLC who were treated at academic facility types had a significantly higher overall median survival compared to community facility types. The short-term surgical quality outcomes were significantly better for patients who underwent surgery for early stage NSCLC at academic facility types.