Surgical Intervention for Patients With Spinal Metastasis From Lung Cancer: A Retrospective Study of 87 Cases

Lung Cancer
01/09/2020

Clin Spine Surg. 2020 Aug 28. doi: 10.1097/BSD.0000000000001062. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective study.

OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the prognosis and surgical outcomes of patients with spinal metastasis from lung cancer undergoing surgical treatment.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The spine is the most common site of metastatic lesions in patients with lung cancer. There have been a few studies, all small cohorts studying prognosis and surgical outcomes and the results were discordant.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study on a prospectively collected database was conducted. Data collected were the following: age, tobacco use, tumor histology, American Spinal Injury Association score, revised Tokuhashi score, ambulatory status, perioperative complications, postoperative adjuvant treatment, and survival time. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the prognostic factors of survival.

RESULTS: The authors studied 87 patients with a mean age of 61.3±1.9 years. Median survival was 4.1±0.8 months. Twenty-eight patients (32.2%) lived >6 months and 14 patients (16.1%) lived >12 months. The medical complication rate was 13.8% and the surgical complication rate was 5.7%. The 30-day mortality rate was 4.6%. Univariate analysis showed tobacco use, revised Tokuhashi score, preoperative and postoperative American Spinal Injury Association score, postoperative walking ability, postoperative radiotherapy, and postoperative chemotherapy were prognostic factors. There was no significant difference in survival between adenoma lung cancers, nonadenoma lung cancers, and small cell lung cancers (P=0.51). Multivariate analysis revealed tobacco use, revised Tokuhashi score, postoperative walking ability, postoperative radiotherapy, and postoperative chemotherapy affected the survival.

CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest reported study of patients with spinal metastasis from lung cancer undergoing spinal surgery. It is the first study showing that tobacco use has a negative impact on survival. Spinal surgery improves the quality of life and offers nonambulatory patients a high chance of regaining walking ability with an acceptable risk of complications.