Health Care Resource Utilization and Costs Among Medicare Beneficiaries Newly Diagnosed With Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma: A Retrospective Claims Analysis

Lymphoma
13/11/2020

Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk. 2020 Jul 22:S2152-2650(20)30372-4. doi: 10.1016/j.clml.2020.07.011. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited data on the treatment patterns, health care resource utilization (HRU), survival outcomes, and medical costs among Medicare beneficiaries newly diagnosed with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL).

PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of data from the Medicare Fee-For-Service claims database using the 100% sample of the Medicare research identifiable files. Patients identified for analysis were aged ≥ 65 years and had received a PTCL diagnosis between January 2011 and December 2017. Outcomes included patient characteristics, HRU, direct all-cause and PTCL-specific health care costs, treatment patterns, and overall survival. Patients were followed until disenrollment, death, or end of the study period.

RESULTS: Overall, 2551 patients with PTCL were included, among whom 37% had ≥ 1 emergency department visit and 42% had ≥ 1 hospitalization during the pre-index period. During follow-up (median, 2.0 years), 70% of patients were hospitalized at least once (mean length of stay, 1.34 days); 22% advanced to hospice care. A total of 1593 patients received ≥ 1 identifiable treatment regimen post index, of whom 26% received CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) and 3% CHOEP (CHOP plus etoposide), whereas 71% received other regimens. The median overall survival among patients receiving identifiable therapy was 4.6 years. The mean adjusted per-person-per-month all-cause costs among the overall PTCL cohort during follow-up were $5930; the mean disease-related costs were $2384. Costs were driven primarily by hospitalizations (38%) and outpatient services (28%).

CONCLUSIONS: Medicare beneficiaries newly diagnosed with PTCL have high HRU and cost burden, with no evident standard of care in real-world practice.